Services

Frequently asked questions

 

 

Q: Why should I pay $29.99 to use our service?

A: You should pay $29.99 to use our service because it is a fair and reasonable price for the value and convenience we provide. Our service helps you file complaints and requests about cops and companies in a fast and easy way. You don’t have to deal with complicated legal procedures, paperwork, or fees. We do all the work for you, from creating, submitting, and tracking your complaint or request, to obtaining records and documents, to connecting you with attorneys and representatives. We also protect your privacy and security, and keep you updated and informed throughout the process. By using our service, you can save time and money, and get the justice and satisfaction you deserve. 💯

You can compare our price with the average cost of filing a complaint or a lawsuit, which can range from $50 to $15,000, depending on the type and complexity of your case. You can also read some of our success stories and testimonials from our satisfied customers [here]. We are confident that you will find our service worth paying for. 😊

 

**Q: How long does it take to get a response from the agency or business I filed a complaint or request with?**

A: The time it takes to get a response from the agency or business you filed a complaint or request with may vary depending on the type and complexity of your complaint or request, the workload and policies of the agency or business, and the laws and regulations that apply to your case. Generally, you should expect to receive a response within 30 to 90 days. You can use Justice Sentinel to check the status of your complaint or request and receive updates and reminders.

 

**Q: How do I protect my privacy and security when using Justice Sentinel?**

A: Justice Sentinel is committed to protecting your privacy and security when using our service. We use encryption, authentication, and other security measures to ensure that your data is safe and confidential. We do not share your personal information with any third parties without your consent, unless required by law or court order. You can use Justice Sentinel to review our privacy policy and terms of service, and to manage your account settings and preferences.

 

 

 

**Q: What is Justice Sentinel and how does it work?**

A: Justice Sentinel is a website that helps you file complaints and requests related to law enforcement officers and businesses. You can use Justice Sentinel to report police misconduct, request body camera footage, request public records, and more. Justice Sentinel will guide you through the process of filling out the necessary forms and submitting them to the appropriate agencies. Justice Sentinel will also provide you with resources and support to follow up on your complaints and requests.

 

**Q: How do I file a complaint against a police officer or a business?**

A: To file a complaint against a police officer or a business, you need to create an account on Justice Sentinel and log in. Then, you need to select the type of complaint you want to make, such as excessive force, abuse of authority, discrimination, or fraud. You will be asked to provide some details about the incident, such as the date, time, location, names of the parties involved, and any witnesses or evidence. You will also be asked to upload any documents or photos that support your complaint. Justice Sentinel will generate a complaint form for you and send it to the relevant agency, such as the Civilian Complaint Review Board, the Internal Affairs Bureau, or the Better Business Bureau.

 

**Q: How do I request body camera footage from a police encounter?**

A: To request body camera footage from a police encounter, you need to create an account on Justice Sentinel and log in. Then, you need to select the option to request body camera footage and provide some information about the encounter, such as the date, time, location, names and badge numbers of the officers involved, and the reason for the request. You will also need to provide a color copy of your photo identification. Justice Sentinel will generate a request form for you and send it to the law enforcement agency that has the footage, such as the NYPD, the LAPD, or the Minneapolis Police Department. You will receive a confirmation email from Justice Sentinel and a response from the agency within a certain period of time, depending on the state laws and agency policies.

 

**Q: How do I request public records from a government agency or a business?**

A: To request public records from a government agency or a business, you need to create an account on Justice Sentinel and log in. Then, you need to select the option to request public records and provide some information about the records you want to access, such as the name of the agency or business, the type of records, the date range, and the purpose of the request. You will also need to provide your contact information and pay any applicable fees. Justice Sentinel will generate a request form for you and send it to the agency or business that has the records, such as the Office of Open Records, the Department of Justice, or the Corporation Service Company. You will receive a confirmation email from Justice Sentinel and a response from the agency or business within a certain period of time, depending on the state laws and business policies.

 

**Bad Cops That Lie and Ruin Lives: How Justice Sentinel Can Make a Difference**

Police officers are supposed to protect and serve the public, uphold the law, and ensure justice. However, not all cops are honest and trustworthy. Some of them lie, cheat, and abuse their power to harm innocent people and cover up their crimes. These bad cops not only violate the rights and dignity of their victims, but also undermine the credibility and legitimacy of the entire law enforcement system. In this blog post, I will discuss some of the ways that bad cops lie and ruin lives, and how Justice Sentinel, a new initiative that aims to expose and prevent police misconduct, can make a positive change.

One of the most common and dangerous ways that bad cops lie is by falsifying evidence or testimony to convict someone of a crime they did not commit. This can result in wrongful convictions, which deprive innocent people of their freedom, reputation, and opportunities. According to the Innocence Project, a nonprofit organization that works to exonerate the wrongly convicted, there have been 375 DNA exonerations in the United States since 1989, and 57% of them involved official misconduct by police or prosecutors¹. Some of the forms of misconduct include planting or tampering with evidence, coercing confessions, fabricating witnesses, and lying under oath. For example, in 1977 and 1978, two women were brutally murdered in Atascadero, California, and the cases remained unsolved for decades. In 2019, thanks to DNA evidence, the suspect was identified as Arthur Rudy Martinez, a parolee who had died in 2014²³. However, it was also revealed that Martinez had been framed by a corrupt detective, who had planted his blood at the crime scenes and coerced a false confession from him. Martinez had spent 18 years in prison for the murders he did not commit, before he escaped and lived under a false identity until his death²³.

Another way that bad cops lie and ruin lives is by using excessive or unnecessary force against civilians, especially those who belong to marginalized or minority groups. Police brutality can cause physical, psychological, and emotional harm to the victims, and sometimes even death. According to a database compiled by the Washington Post, 6,211 people have been fatally shot by the police in the United States since 2015, and Black people are more than twice as likely as white people to be killed by the police⁴. Moreover, many cases of police violence are not reported, investigated, or prosecuted, due to the lack of transparency, accountability, and oversight in the law enforcement system. Some of the factors that enable this impunity include the use of body cameras that can be turned off or edited, the reluctance of prosecutors and judges to challenge the police, the influence of police unions and lobbyists, and the culture of silence and loyalty among officers. For instance, in 2020, a 75-year-old man was violently shoved by a police officer during a peaceful protest in Buffalo, New York, and suffered a serious head injury. The police department initially claimed that the man had tripped and fallen, and the officer who pushed him was not disciplined. However, a video of the incident contradicted the police statement and sparked public outrage. The officer was later charged with assault, but the case is still pending⁵.

So, what can be done to stop the bad cops from lying and ruining lives? How can we ensure that the police are held accountable for their actions and that justice is served for the victims? This is where Justice Sentinel comes in. Justice Sentinel is a new initiative that aims to expose and prevent police misconduct, by using the power of technology, journalism, and activism. Justice Sentinel has three main goals: to collect and analyze data on police behavior and outcomes, to report and share stories of police misconduct and its impact, and to advocate and mobilize for reforms and solutions. Some of the tools and methods that Justice Sentinel uses include:

- A website that provides a comprehensive and searchable database of police misconduct cases, statistics, and resources, as well as a platform for people to report and document their own experiences with the police.
- A podcast that features interviews with experts, activists, and survivors of police misconduct, as well as discussions on the latest news and developments on the issue.
- A newsletter that delivers regular updates and analysis on police misconduct trends, policies, and actions, as well as tips and advice on how to protect oneself and others from police abuse.
- A social media campaign that raises awareness and educates the public about police misconduct, and encourages people to join the movement and take action.
- A network of partners and allies that collaborate and coordinate with Justice Sentinel to expose and prevent police misconduct, such as civil rights organizations, legal aid groups, community leaders, and media outlets.

Justice Sentinel believes that by shining a light on the dark side of policing, we can expose the truth, hold the bad cops accountable, and demand justice for the victims. Justice Sentinel also believes that by empowering and engaging the people, we can create a positive change, and transform the police from a force that lies and ruins lives, to a service that protects and serves the public.

If you are interested in learning more about Justice Sentinel, or joining the initiative, please visit their website at [www.justicesentinel.com], or follow them on [Facebook], [Twitter], or [Instagram]. Together, we can make a difference.

--